Why Pan-European?

In age of aggressive and divisive identity politics, it is important to know our place in the world, where we stand in relation to others.

Where do we stand in relation to other Europeans? What is our identity?

The “European Vision” – the vision associated with the European Union – reasonable freedom of movement between countries, alliance with fellow Europeans, a common European identity – is something many of us can relate to, and what many in favour of the European Union appear to embrace. Unfortunately this is not at all what the crooked, unelected bureaucrats of the EU elite stand for, they have divided Europe, not united it, and will eventually seek to erase what is left of regional languages, such as Irish and Basque, perhaps most languages in favour of a “lingua franca” eventually. They want to build an “EU army”, they want to pave the way for a “United States of Europe” that will remove any real regional culture or diversity.

So what use does Pan-Europeanism have in these dark times? Is “nationalism” worth saving? What is our real identity, what is most logical and productive, more unifying?

The reality is all modern nationalism has roots in divisive 19th century nationalism and artificially constructed national identities that mostly consist of art, clothing, musical instruments etc. borrowed from other countries. It is rooted in meaningless Christian nationalism – the notion of which is a glaring contradiction in itself, as the Bible’s stance on distinct nations (most nations that is…) as opposed to a united globalist “nation “of God is pretty clear.

Even when we try to rescue it and guide it in an “ethno-nationalist” direction with pagan leanings, it’s still rooted in this outdated, 19th century “patriotic” mentality. It is still divisive, and it hinders us.

There is of course the debate about what parts of Europe, even if we accept them as European, are just “too different”, with distinctions here being commonly made between North and South.  There is this idea still that there are distinct “phenotypes” even, and European “sub-races” that must be preserved.

Is it really that simple, however?

I will share my personal experience with an “identity crisis” of sorts; I embraced paganism in my mid-teens, having been deprived of any history lessons in school relating to Saxons or Vikings, listening to black metal and folk metal and reading the articles by Varg Vikernes immediately awakened something. I knew it was something real, something instinctive, something heartfelt – I knew this attachment to Norse history meant something, I began to understand it as an ancestral homeland. I also began to feel the same way about Germany to a degree, having some German ancestry.

I kept this identity in mind, and kept returning to it, this “Nordic” identity. I was perhaps less concerned with Anglo-Saxon heritage for quite a long time, perhaps because the myths  and folk tales were more fragmented and less conveniently packaged than those in the Eddas, or perhaps for no reason other than “they were converted to Christianity first, so they are less interesting”…

More importantly, however, for many years, though not disliking or disowning it as such, I simply lacked interest in Celtic identity, Celtic myths, Celtic culture and pride. I just didn’t feel it – because I don’t think I really wanted to. Despite several Celtic ancestors, I simply found it a lot more convenient and more straightforward to identity as “Germanic” and “Nordic”. Perhaps it was anti-English sentiment of modern Celtic nationalism, perhaps I just didn’t like the traditional folk music as much, perhaps I convinced myself the myths would be overly Christianised and not worth bothering with (more on this in a later video), or perhaps it was simply because I haven’t travelled in these places.

I suppose because of a combination of the toxic nature of resentful, divisive anti-English Celtic “nationalism” these days and the acceptance of the genetic makeup of the British Isles, I did eventually overcome this, and saw a need for a common, British identity, the need to embrace a shared heritage and history. Norse myths are important, but they aren’t everything. It is just another European pantheon.

Britain’s “Anglo-Saxon” roots:

30-40% (depending on region)

The traditional narrative states that the Anglo-Saxons essentially committed genocide against the Celts, claiming England as their own. Ælle of Sussex, for example, is said to have brutally massacred the Britons he defeated. Some still support this theory. The revisionist theory argues that Anglo-Saxon England was more of an “apartheid” state, with an elite of Anglo-Saxons ruling over the Briton majority. Both extreme narratives are incorrect, as a recent 2016 study shows. It does not “prove we are Anglo-Saxon”, but it does prove they contributed a significant amount to our ancestry and population.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4735688/

Iceland:

“62% of Icelanders’ matrilineal ancestry derives from Scotland and Ireland (with most of the rest being from Scandinavia), while 75% of their patrilineal ancestry derives from Scandinavia (with most of the rest being from the Irish and British Isles).”

“One study found that the mean Norse ancestry among Iceland’s settlers was 56%, whereas in the current population the figure was 70%.”

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1028

Celts:
“Sardinian like Neolithic farmers did populate Britain (and all of Northern Europe) during the Neolithic period, however, recent genetics research has claimed that, between 2400BC and 2000BC, over 90% of British DNA was overturned by a North European population of ultimate Russian Steppe origin as part of an ongoing migration process that brought large amounts of Steppe DNA (including the R1b haplogroup) to North and West Europe.”

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/135962v1

Recent studies have also indicated origins in the Ukrainian and Russian steppe of both Germanic and Slavic people. We must understand that Celts are essentially the same people, with the main differences being a language family more closely related to Latin than the Germanic languages and trace Mediterranean ancestry. Origins of proto-Celtic culture place them in central Europe around what is now Austria and Czechia.

Countries like Germany, France, Switzerland, Austria and Britain have both Celtic and Germanic ancestry. These were both Celtic and Germanic territories in ancient times. Furthermore, the Viking Slave Trade further dispersed Celtic genes throughout northern Europe.

Do we need to have an “identity” crisis just because we have such a mix of European ancestry? Do we really need to “simplify” things as I once chose to by fixating on one pantheon and identifying as simply “Germanic”, “Norse” or “Celtic”? We are European, we share the same roots, the culture is the same, for the most part the language is at its root the same. We have gone through too much to be divided by stubborn regional pride and nationalism. Accepting a less “homogenous” European ancestry helps us understand other Europeans better.